Category Archives: xubuntu

Xubuntu 16.04 LTS “Xenial Xerus” Released

Here we are again, folks. After six more months of development (two years since the last LTS), we’ve got another fantastic release — Xubuntu 16.04 LTS “Xenial Xerus”!  I wanted to find a nice squirrel quote, but it seems most folks have a horrific dislike for the little critters. — Myself, after looking up squirrel … Continue reading Xubuntu 16.04 LTS “Xenial Xerus” Released

Translation Updates!

Some releases are notable only for their improved translations.  LightDM GTK+ Greeter Settings 1.2.1, MenuLibre 2.1.3, and Xfce Panel Switch 1.0.4 are such releases. Translation Updates LightDM GTK+ Greeter Settings Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, Catalan, Chinese (Simplified), Croatian, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Japanese, Lithuanian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish MenuLibre Brazilian Portuguese, Chinese (Simplified), Croatian, Czech, … Continue reading Translation Updates!

Catfish 1.3.4 Released (New PPA)

With a slew of updates and a new build system, Catfish 1.3.4 is now available! This update fixes a number of bugs, adds initial support for PolicyKit, and introduces a new PPA for Ubuntu users. What’s New? New Features Initial PolicyKit integration for requesting administrative rights to update the search database. Bug Fixes Fixes for … Continue reading Catfish 1.3.4 Released (New PPA)

Xubuntu 15.10 Available

A new release of Xubuntu is just around the corner!  The release candidate for Xubuntu 15.10 “Wily Werewolf” is now available, with the final release expected less than a week from now on October 22.  What’s New? This list highlights several new features and applications, but is by no means exhaustive.  This post will be … Continue reading Xubuntu 15.10 Available

Parole Media Player 0.8.1 Released

It’s been nearly 8 months since the first release in Parole’s 0.8 stable series. Yesterday, Parole Media Player 0.8.1 was released in time to be included in Xubuntu 15.10.  This release includes several bug fixes and makes for another great release. What’s New? New Feature-ish New hidden setting to persistently hide the menubar been sessions. This … Continue reading Parole Media Player 0.8.1 Released

Catfish 1.3.3 Released

The latest version of Catfish (1.3.3) was released on October 8th.  This release follows the current development cycle where I am improving usability and tackling bugs big and small.   Changes Since 1.3.0 New Features The headerbar window decorations are now optional, and can be toggled with the use-headerbar setting Updated Translations: German, Greek, Finnish, French, … Continue reading Catfish 1.3.3 Released

Xfce Panel Switch: Introduction

Xubuntu 15.10 “Wily Werewolf” introduces a new application for managing panel layouts in Xfce, Xfce Panel Switch. This is a simple utility application that fills a void for appearance tweakers and distributors alike.   Features Backup and restore panel configurations Share panel layouts with simple exporting and importing Choose from one of 5 included layouts, or … Continue reading Xfce Panel Switch: Introduction

LightDM GTK+ Greeter 2.0.1 and Settings 1.2.0 Releases

LightDM GTK+ Greeter and it’s accompanying configuration application have been updated!  A number of bugs have been fixed in the greeter, and a new multihead configuration dialog has been added to LightDM GTK+ Greeter Settings. Update 2015/06/16 Both applications have been added to the Stable PPA.  Some users are reporting a solid-color background on some … Continue reading LightDM GTK+ Greeter 2.0.1 and Settings 1.2.0 Releases

What’s New in Xubuntu 15.04

Another 6 months of development has come and gone and we have a new Xubuntu release!  This release includes the hotly anticipated Xfce 4.12, released on February 28, as well as all of the typical application, appearance, documentation, and translation updates. Left: Xubuntu 14.10, Right: Xubuntu 15.04 What’s New? With the release of Xfce 4.12, … Continue reading What’s New in Xubuntu 15.04

How to start contributing to Xfce or any other open source project

It’s been a while since I’ve updated this website and even longer since I’ve written anything useful. But since I’ve received a couple of mails from people looking to contribute to Xfce recently, I thought I’d share some “wisdom” acquired over the past few years while working on Xfce and doing a lot of community work. My thoughts are not limited to Xfce and will apply to a lot of other projects out there as well.

Here’s the bitter truth for those looking for some quick pointers to start contributing to Xfce: you’ll have to find out yourself.

The reason is not that we are lazy or wouldn’t welcome your contributions. In fact, the reason, I believe, is very simple: you will be more excited, motivated and, ultimate, be more successful if you work on something that interests you. We can help you in making the decision what to invest your time in easier, e.g. by listing projects, features or issues that we or our users consider worth working on. Some projects do this very visibly (e.g. through bounties). In Xfce, this information is hidden in the depths of the wiki. Here are a few links that you may find interesting:

Clearly, the above information could be more visible. There could be a prominent link on the Xfce website to a well-maintained and up-to-date list. Would that help people? Maybe.

Perhaps it is a good thing that the information isn’t just one click away. Open source projects have always been about scratching your own itch. This is how I got involved in everything I’ve done over the years. this approach is reflected by what people do and sometimes even by how companies make money. Thinking about it now, it is a concept deeply rooted in the evolution of mankind (think: the invention and improvement of tools, industrialisation and all that shit).

So: scratch your own itch.

If you want to start contributing to a project, try this exercise:

  • Look at the project, think about what you don’t like or what you feel could be improved
  • Try to collect information on what pieces are involved in e.g. the feature you’re missing or the bug you’ve spotted
  • Try to find the place where you could try adding your feature or fixing your bug
  • Ask whether developers are interested in the feature or look at whether there already is an item for your issue in the bug tracker
  • The rest is communication and coding

It’s not a fast path because you might not be able to contribute something of great value in the beginning. But if you’re dedicated, have enough spare time to make a difference and are keen on improving things step by step, you might eventually reach a point where you take over responsibility for more and more exciting or important tasks.

Good luck!